Oral presentation or poster presentation?

I’m stepping away from the mental health focussed posts for a few weeks to bring you a new ‘conference series’. The plan is to help with decisions around presenting at conferences and to also provide handy guides to producing presentations that will help you communicate your work as succinctly and professionally as possible. Of course, I can’t completely step away from the self-care approach to studies, so this week’s post, which helps you decide between either a poster presentation or an oral presentation offers practical considerations but also personal factors to take into account in order to do what is right for you. I hope you enjoy this new series!

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Addicted to our desks?

When I look around me I see that it is becoming more and more acceptable to work long hours, evenings, weekends and for work to ‘take over’ our lives, often to the detriment of our health and well-being.

I see this so frequently in academia, in my fellow PhD students and in the academics I meet. People often joke with each other about being a workaholic and it has become somewhat of a status symbol, but for some of us it is a real addiction, and a very challenging one at that.

Yes, I consider myself a recovering workaholic.

I’m certainly a work (!) in progress, but I feel like I’ve come a long way in the last few years and am able to manage my work addiction. It is something I feel strongly about and I want to share some of what I have learnt. This post is the first in a series that will focus on breaking the habit of working compulsively. I’m going to dismantle the concept of workaholism and share some of the things that have helped me to restore balance.

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