An honest and vulnerable share…

Yes, this is my second post in as many days.

I sat down to write this post late last night after having dinner with a friend and only a few hours after my last post – which was all about non-negotiables and self-care. It feels kind of ironic in a way.

I was unsure whether to publish this post, but I decided to, and sooner rather than later – before I changed my mind. Because it’s always easier to talk about past struggles once they have been overcome and things are feeling better. It’s much more difficult and vulnerable to admit in the moment that things are hard.

I decided to post this because I am a huge advocate for mental health and I am always banging on about how important it is to share our difficult and challenging experiences in order for them to become accepted and so that we can know we are not alone – and I feel nervous about posting this. I feel like maybe I shouldn’t. But that isn’t what I aspire to, I want an open conversation and I’m going to have it. I believe that it really should not be a big deal to say you are struggling or that you’ve lost your way.

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Addicted to our desks? Part 3.

Hello there. Welcome to the third and final part of my series about recovering from work addiction. In the first post I covered what work addiction is, what purpose it serves and some signs to look out for. My second post involved thinking about and tackling beliefs surrounding work, productivity and success. This final post will give you some practical skills and tips to start you on your way to seeking a more balanced approach to working. This is all very personal, and these are things that have helped me and others that I have spoken to you. Perhaps none of these tips will apply to you, in which case I encourage you to seek out somebody who might be able to help you put together your own tool kit to help you.

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Addicted to our desks? Part 2.

Hello again. In my last post I introduced a new three-part series dedicated to understanding and tackling work addiction and spent some time outlining workaholism, the challenges of overcoming it and some warning signs.

This time I’m going to dive a little deeper, and invite you to question some of your beliefs surrounding the way you approach work, what you might be gaining from work and how to start to change your prospective. These are only my experiences and my suggestions, there are undoubtedly a number of ways to approach this. I’d invite you to share your experiences if you have any, or to challenge any of the points I make.

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Addicted to our desks?

When I look around me I see that it is becoming more and more acceptable to work long hours, evenings, weekends and for work to ‘take over’ our lives, often to the detriment of our health and well-being.

I see this so frequently in academia, in my fellow PhD students and in the academics I meet. People often joke with each other about being a workaholic and it has become somewhat of a status symbol, but for some of us it is a real addiction, and a very challenging one at that.

Yes, I consider myself a recovering workaholic.

I’m certainly a work (!) in progress, but I feel like I’ve come a long way in the last few years and am able to manage my work addiction. It is something I feel strongly about and I want to share some of what I have learnt. This post is the first in a series that will focus on breaking the habit of working compulsively. I’m going to dismantle the concept of workaholism and share some of the things that have helped me to restore balance.

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