How to nail an academic poster presentation

Creating the poster

First up, you need to make sure you know what the specifications of your poster are. Things like whether the poster is landscape or portrait, and what the dimensions are. Stick to these specifications – you don’t want to turn up to a conference and have your poster hanging off the space you were provided or fall down because it is not the right size.

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Oral presentation or poster presentation?

I’m stepping away from the mental health focussed posts for a few weeks to bring you a new ‘conference series’. The plan is to help with decisions around presenting at conferences and to also provide handy guides to producing presentations that will help you communicate your work as succinctly and professionally as possible. Of course, I can’t completely step away from the self-care approach to studies, so this week’s post, which helps you decide between either a poster presentation or an oral presentation offers practical considerations but also personal factors to take into account in order to do what is right for you. I hope you enjoy this new series!

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13 Ways to Recruit Study Participants Online 

Ask any PhD student who requires participants for their research and no doubt one of their main challenges will be recruitment. Over the years I’ve had a number of experiences with recruitment and I have faced multiple issues, particularly when recruiting from a population such as young carers.

This post won’t go into all the difficulties and considerations that need to be made when recruiting, I have another post coming up about approaches and questions to ask yourself when you start looking for people to take part in your research. Instead this post is going to provide 13 ways that you can recruit for your study online (but not necessarily just for online studies !) in the hope that it might be able to reduce your recruitment woes.

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