Reflections on taking part in an Instagram challenge

Hello, it’s been a minute! I hope that everyone has enjoyed their summer and had the chance to have a break.

In today’s post I want to reflect on my experience of taking part in a 31-day Instagram Challenge. Read on to find out what I learnt, whether I would do it again and whether I recommend it.

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12 Apps for time & life management

Some people argue that a PhD is simply a test of perseverance and time management. I personally disagree with that statement, there is a lot more to getting your doctorate, but it cannot be argued that time management is not important. Understanding how you work, when you work best and how to manage your time are really vital in navigating and enjoying any type of study or busy lifestyle.

For some, myself included, this grappling with time management can be helped by using technology and ‘apps’. As I’ve mentioned I’ve recently moved onto a new way of organising my time, away from technology. But there are still definitely elements of my life and study that are managed via a few apps on my phone. In this post I share some that I use, and some that I have used in the past. Let me know if you have any apps that you love to utilise and help you boost your productivity.

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13 Ways to Recruit Study Participants Online 

Ask any PhD student who requires participants for their research and no doubt one of their main challenges will be recruitment. Over the years I’ve had a number of experiences with recruitment and I have faced multiple issues, particularly when recruiting from a population such as young carers.

This post won’t go into all the difficulties and considerations that need to be made when recruiting, I have another post coming up about approaches and questions to ask yourself when you start looking for people to take part in your research. Instead this post is going to provide 13 ways that you can recruit for your study online (but not necessarily just for online studies !) in the hope that it might be able to reduce your recruitment woes.

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Breaking (it) down?

Hello again. Before starting this post I want to thank everyone for their great feedback and engagement with the ‘Addicted to our desks?’ series. It was a real pleasure to write and I’m so glad that it was well received and helpful. It’s great to hear from those of you who have implemented some of the tips. If you ever want to get in touch with me, you can do so here.

In this post I want to talk about break downs! Or perhaps more accurately, breaking things down. I’ve reached a point in my PhD where things are starting to get busy, one of those times where marking, data analysis and planning for my next study all seem to coincide – and it’s easy to start getting rather stressed and anxious about starting things.

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Addicted to our desks? Part 3.

Hello there. Welcome to the third and final part of my series about recovering from work addiction. In the first post I covered what work addiction is, what purpose it serves and some signs to look out for. My second post involved thinking about and tackling beliefs surrounding work, productivity and success. This final post will give you some practical skills and tips to start you on your way to seeking a more balanced approach to working. This is all very personal, and these are things that have helped me and others that I have spoken to you. Perhaps none of these tips will apply to you, in which case I encourage you to seek out somebody who might be able to help you put together your own tool kit to help you.

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Addicted to our desks? Part 2.

Hello again. In my last post I introduced a new three-part series dedicated to understanding and tackling work addiction and spent some time outlining workaholism, the challenges of overcoming it and some warning signs.

This time I’m going to dive a little deeper, and invite you to question some of your beliefs surrounding the way you approach work, what you might be gaining from work and how to start to change your prospective. These are only my experiences and my suggestions, there are undoubtedly a number of ways to approach this. I’d invite you to share your experiences if you have any, or to challenge any of the points I make.

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Addicted to our desks?

When I look around me I see that it is becoming more and more acceptable to work long hours, evenings, weekends and for work to ‘take over’ our lives, often to the detriment of our health and well-being.

I see this so frequently in academia, in my fellow PhD students and in the academics I meet. People often joke with each other about being a workaholic and it has become somewhat of a status symbol, but for some of us it is a real addiction, and a very challenging one at that.

Yes, I consider myself a recovering workaholic.

I’m certainly a work (!) in progress, but I feel like I’ve come a long way in the last few years and am able to manage my work addiction. It is something I feel strongly about and I want to share some of what I have learnt. This post is the first in a series that will focus on breaking the habit of working compulsively. I’m going to dismantle the concept of workaholism and share some of the things that have helped me to restore balance.

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